Metro Detroit: Newsmakers Feb 28, 2008

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Detroit News:

When ex-TV news reporter Suzanne Marie Wangler's body was found in her home last weekend, an apparent suicide, there was no note, not a word of explanation left behind for those who loved or knew her. Her 43-year-old life at times seemed bright and glamorous from the outside, but was anything but perfect, according to Oakland Circuit Court records that show she wrestled with a variety of personal problems, civil and criminal. Wangler held high-profile news jobs, married the former star quarterback and raised four children in a big, fancy house. But a rocky divorce, money problems and legal troubles including a DUI conviction and charges of embezzlement painted a different picture that those who knew her said were really cries for help. "Suzanne was not a bad person -- she had a lot of good qualities, did good things for people and was the mother of my four children," said her ex-husband John Wangler, a former University of Michigan football standout. "They, her family, all of us are devastated by this. But while we would prefer her memory be positive, she had some serious problems and mental health issues that were never addressed or even diagnosed, as far as I know"... Ex-reporter's life a troubled dream (Thu, 2/28)


The Detroit Historical Museum is launching a special exhibit on Saturday, March 8, "Detroit's Classic Radio Voices," putting the spotlight on six of Detroit's most beloved radio icons. The exhibit honors the late J.P. McCarthy of WJR (760) fame; Tigers broadcaster and Baseball Hall of Famer Ernie Harwell ; weather quipster Sonny Eliot (WWJ, WWJ-TV and WJBK-TV); R&B/talk personality, the late Martha Jean "the Queen" Steinberg (WCHB, WJLB and her own station, WQBH); perennial morning host/funnyman Dick Purtan (WKNR, WOMC); and longtime "Ask Your Neighbor" host Bob Allison (WWJ, WNZK). Allison also hosted "Bowling for Dollars" on WJBK-TV2 and appeared as the kindly Twin Pines milkman on the Channel 4 '60s kid show "Milky's Party Time"... Exhibit pays homage to radio voices of Detroit (Thu, 2/28)


It's the secret nightmare of every cancer survivor -- will the disease come back? Red Wings broadcaster Mickey Redmond is living that situation right now, working on recovering from another incidence of lung cancer. Redmond underwent surgery Feb.11, having a tumor removed from his left lung. He had much of his right lung removed in 2003, in his first brush with cancer. He's traveled this road before, but dealing with a serious illness never is easy. "It's been a lot of things: shock at them finding cancer again in me, then knowing I'd had to do the surgery, then the pain afterwards, and recovering," Redmond, 60, said Wednesday. "This is not a simple thing. My body hurts a little more than the first time. I guess they had to be a little rougher with me to get in there. "But I'm optimistic for the future and grateful for everything. This is something I intend to fight through"... Redmond goes 2nd round with cancer (Thu, 2/28)

 

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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Mike Austerman published on February 28, 2008 8:22 AM.

Metro Detroit: Newsmakers Feb 27, 2008 was the previous entry in this blog.

Metro Detroit/Mid-Michigan: Newsmakers Feb 29, 2008 is the next entry in this blog.

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